4 Ways to Revive a Dying Book Club

Like so many other things — investing in a timeshare, having a third child — starting a book club seemed like a good idea at first, but things have taken a turn.


Suddenly, instead of preparing for meetings, your club members prepare excuses for why they can’t come this month. Or next month.

Is your club beyond saving?

No!

According to Molly Lundquist, a former college English instructor and founder of LitLovers, a site devoted to reading and book clubs, the best way to revive a foundering club is to break out of your same-old, same-old rut and try something new, such as:

  • Hold a Free-Form Meeting. Instead of assigning a book to read, ask members to come with whatever they’re reading. During the evening, invite everyone to talk a little about what s/he is reading at the moment. See where the conversation takes you.
  • Host a Film Night. Of course the book is better than the movie, but so what? For fun, pick a film based on a book most (if not all) of you have read, and watch it together. Afterward, chat about how it compared to the book.
  • Go on a Field Trip. Is an interesting author coming to town for a reading or book-signing? Attend the event as a group! By doing something literary together, you’ll be reminded of why you joined a book club in the first place — for the camaraderie.
  • Cook the Books. Have a potluck dinner where each member brings a dish inspired by a particular story. True, the gruel from Oliver Twist may not be a hit, but a few decadent chutneys a la Midnight’s Children (or vodka honoring The Master and Margarita) will be.

 

 

 

 

However you decide to resurrect your book club, says Lundquist, the key is to mix things up a little. Clubs tend to die when they get boring — so don’t give yours a chance to!

LitLovers offers a treasure trove of information covering every aspect of book clubs, from getting started to choosing the perfect title to read next. Log on to find terrific ideas for your club.


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