Roberta Rubenstein

Roberta Rubenstein recently retired as emerita professor from the Department of Literature at American University after a distinguished teaching career. Her scholarly interests include fiction by modernist and contemporary women writers — Virginia Woolf, Doris Lessing, Toni Morrison, and Margaret Atwood, among others — as well as literature of the fantastic and 19th-century Russian literature. She is the author of five scholarly books including, most recently, Virginia Woolf and the Russian Point of View and Literary Half-Lives: Doris Lessing, Clancy Sigal, and Roman à Clef. Her monograph, Reminiscences of Leonard Woolf, describes her friendship with Virginia Woolf’s husband while she was writing her doctoral dissertation on the writer at University of London.


9 entries by Roberta Rubenstein

Book Review

Talland House

By Maggie Humm

This homage to Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is a wonderful tale in its own right.

Book Review

Talland House: A Novel

By Maggie Humm

This homage to Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse is a wonderful tale in its own right.

Book Review

Grief Cottage: A Novel

By Gail Godwin

This powerful story about one boy’s loss reflects on what it means to be haunted.

Book Review

The Heart Goes Last: A Novel

By Margaret Atwood

This powerhouse of a novel is stuffed with ideas on economic hardship, sex, the surveillance state, and much, much more.

Book Review

A fascinating, fictionalized look at Virginia Woolf's lesser-known — but equally talented — sibling.

Book Review

Stone Mattress: Nine Tales

By Margaret Atwood

A brilliant collection that playfully reveals the darker shadings of human experience.

Book Review

Barbara Kingsolver

In this novel, overwintering Monarch butterflies settle in the Appalachian woods. When a young mother discovers the butterfly forest, she and other community members ponder the meaning and causes of this new phenomenon, arriving at different conclusions.

Book Review

Alexandra Popoff

Through their devotion and supreme managerial skills, the six spouses in this absorbing book “spoke to the world through their husbands’genius.”

Book Review

By Margaret Drabble

As in her novels, these short stories by a master chronicler examine the moral complexities of women’s lives through several decades.