Harriet Dwinell

Harriet Douty Dwinell’s career began as the lead book reviewer for Pi, the University College London student newspaper. Since that time, she has worked as an editor, writer, and university professor, a ragtag career that she describes as giving form to knowledge. She worked as an editor for the Smithsonian, The Washingtonian, and the League of Women Voters of the United States, where she was senior writer-editor. Her articles have appeared in magazines and newspapers ranging from The New Republic to Family Circle, and including The Washingtonian and the Washington Post. She taught literature and writing at American University for a number of years, first part time, then full time. She guesstimates that she has read, commented upon, and evaluated more than 6500 student essays. She recently completed a memoir of her year in a British Boarding School.


19 entries by Harriet Dwinell

Book Review

Noonday: A Novel

By Pat Barker

Three friends are shattered by jealousy and destruction during the London Blitz

Feature

The author discusses Correspondence Course: The Bathsua Project, her multi-layered debut novel.

Book Review

American Romantic

Ward Just

Ward Just’s latest novel is one part adventure story and two parts reflection

Book Review

Six people, unaware of their connection, are the center of an extraordinary ensemble tale of love and nurture.

Book Review

Finding Camlann

Sean Pidgeon

History, myth and language combine to deliver a new take on Arthurian legend in this debut novel.

Book Review

Christine Schutt

This spare and “gossamer” novel offers an engaging look at the nature of marriage and the challenge of getting it right.

Book Review

Bernhard Schlink, translated from the German by Carol Brown Janeway

Deceit runs through the author’s latest collection of short stories.

Book Review

Susan Henry

Three women who had a deep — and unacknowledged — impact on the media in the early 20th century are given the spotlight in this collective biography.

Book Review

Graham Swift

Using a complex triple narrative, this novel weaves together a universal story of brotherly love.

Book Review

Anne Korkeakivi

A British diplomat’s wife in modern-day Paris, the main character confronts moral and ethical issues by putting her husband’s career aspirations first, but then realizes she must search for redemption and decency. Ultimately, the novel is a celebration of a life unexpectedly set free.

Book Review

Louis Begley

In Begley’s third Schmidt novel, Albert Schmidt returns to reflect on his past and look towards the future.

Book Review

Julian Barnes

In a novel that just won the 2011 Man Booker Prize, the reliability of memory comes into question as a man reflects on the suicide of a gifted friend and confronts their past.

Book Review

Ali Smith

A dinner guest locks himself in the bathroom in this terrific and funny novel.

Book Review

Sonia Arrison

We’re at a “tipping point,” the author argues, of what we can begin to expect from life long lived.

Book Review

Fabio Geda, trans. from the Italian by Howard Curtis

In a novel based on real-life events, a young Afghan boy takes an amazing journey from his homeland to his ultimate destination, Italy.

Book Review

Louisa Thomas

A family memoir looks at how four brothers — including onetime presidential candidate Norman Thomas — wrestled with their changing beliefs in wartime America.

Book Review

Julian Barnes

Intimacy, obsession and sensory details in the nuanced world of social interaction.

Book Review

Ward Just

A quiet menace hovers over Rodin’s Debutante. Whether the action takes place in a small community north of Chicago or in the urban heart of Chicago’s South Side, the novel depicts a world where random violence and uneasy compromise coexist on the boundary of civilization and wilderness. Art, and the will to create art, survive but do not triumph.

Book Review

Susan Jacoby

Susan Jacoby's new book bashes the lie of ‘forever young.’