E.A. Aymar

The first book in E.A. Aymar’s “Dead” trilogy, I’ll Sleep When You’re Dead, was published in the fall of 2013 by Black Opal Books. His essays have appeared in a number of top thriller publications, and his short fiction has been featured in several literary journals. He studied creative writing in college, holds an M.A. in literature, and is an active member of the Mystery Writers of America, the International Thriller Writers, and Sisters in Crime (though he’s a mister). He lives with his wife and son just outside of Washington, DC. To learn more about E.A. Aymar or his work, please visit his website or follow him on Twitter. You can even like him on Facebook. After all, he likes you.


50 entries by E.A. Aymar

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Some movies from yesteryear were eerily prescient

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Readers will love these artists’ unbound lyricism

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Three novels — and a blockbuster new movie — celebrate the fierceness of feminism

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When art gives you goosebumps.

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In defense of The Great Gatsby

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Thoughts on NWA at the LOC

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The case of Milo Yiannopoulos and the missing $250,000

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My third annual writerly (and readerly) Valentine’s Day Q&A

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Why doesn’t the genre get the love it deserves?

Book Review

A solid collection from some of the best writers in the biz.

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A little something for even the most pretentious of readers.

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Feeling a little down this election season? There's a story for that...

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Writing is a powerful weapon. Be careful how you wield it.

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A few takeaways from this year’s conference.

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The Baltimore writer talks controversy, micro-aggression, and the juggling of multiple projects.

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The best writer you’ve never heard of

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A primer for the uninitiated and/or inadequate.

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Celebrate America literarily with these made-in-the-USA titles

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The short-story writer talks crime fiction, Jersey, and the Boss

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My to-be-read stack is getting out of hand

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The impossibility of translating music into words

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It’s okay to (privately) believe you suck at writing

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Seeking input is easier than you think

Book Review

This fascinating look at an oft-misunderstood musical genre suffers from the absence of women

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Writerly advice for the Cupidly confused

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Doing the legwork for a new book opened my eyes to human trafficking

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It’s time to show the grammar police your creative license

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What to give to (and get from) the scribes in your life

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Taking on a second gig doesn’t have to undermine your first

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Give your audience what it wants. And what it wants is less of you.

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There’s a fine line between selling books and selling out.

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Recalling the gifted writer as he recovers from a horrible injury

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The hope-tinged despair of James Baldwin

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How not to shill, er, sell your book

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The challenge — and joy — of writing about Charm City

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The lasting impact of influential influencers

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Give it a reason or give it a rest

Book Review

Someone to Watch Over Me

By Yrsa Sigurdardóttir; translated by Philip Roughton

A stiff protagonist and action left off the page undermine this thriller.

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V-Day is right around the corner, so let’s get to the letters.

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The test of time isn't pass/fail.

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...and how not to make them.

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…for everyone on your gift list, that is.

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How Billie Holiday sang me out of a slump.

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When it comes to writing, it's always drafty in here.

Book Review

The Empty Quarter

David L. Robbins

A tense military thriller proves hard to put down and impossible to forget.

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Can you really hate the artist but love the work?

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Thoughts from a debut writer on attending ThrillerFest.

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Are writers obligated to portray their niches accurately?

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My issues with boundaries.

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A little free advice on writing, life, and the writing life