Dorothy Reno

Dorothy Reno is a senior editor and classics columnist for the Washington Independent Review of Books. She has a B.Sc., a B.Soc.Sc., and an M.A. in international development. Dorothy has worked with the World Bank, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the government of Canada, and the Wabano Center for Aboriginal Health. In 2014, she was a finalist in the District of Columbia for a Larry Neal Writers’ Award. That same year, she started K Street Writers, a writing group aimed at community-building through hermeneutics. Dorothy now lives in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia, with her husband and son, where she teaches English at the Tbilisi Central School of Foreign Languages, and where she is also a student of Georgian. Her short stories have been published in Canada and the United States.


44 entries by Dorothy Reno

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The tangling of philosophy and religion in Crime and Punishment.

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Austen’s polemic against the Romantic movement comes off as a little stiff.

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Reframing The Picture of Dorian Gray

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Flaubert’s realism is sad enough to make you laugh

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A day in the life of modern consciousness

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Hester Prynne’s wisdom as a social outcast

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Mary Shelley’s seminal work exposes the dark side of human nature.

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The persisting allure of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe.

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How literature can improve your life.

Book Review

The Path of the Jaguar: A Novel

By Stephen Henighan

A Mayan woman adapts to the changing times in this well-researched novel set in post-civil-war Guatemala.

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An outstanding collection of tales about the pitfalls and rewards of human connection.

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The novelist explores the darker, more complicated side of motherhood.

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The novelist discusses Unspeakable Things, her daring story of exile and secrets set in WWII-era New York.

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Father’s Day: A Novel

By Simon Van Booy

A quiet, tender story of unlikely adoption and love’s triumph

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Lust & Wonder: A Memoir

By Augusten Burroughs

The tell-all author is back with his signature humor (and lessons in love)

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An acclaimed Canadian writer of poetry and short stories, the author marks her American debut today with the release of her novel The Crooked Heart of Mercy.

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“In existentialism, there are no excuses. Freedom comes with total responsibility.”

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The Crooked Heart of Mercy

By Billie Livingston

A Canadian novelist makes her American debut in this gem of a story about love, faith, and human failings.

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The noted — and knighted — author discusses power and triumph in 1500s Europe.

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Meet a writer for whom "the human condition is the whole point."

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The author discusses relationships, mother-daughter conflicts, and the relative merits of zombies.

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Told from different perspectives, the author’s new novel is all about secrets — those kept and those revealed.

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The Blue between Sky and Water

By Susan Abulhawa

A deeply felt, occasionally foul-mouthed tale about a Palestinian family navigating the birth of Israel.

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The author discusses her new novel, along with dystopia, disease, and her obsession with masks.

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The Language of Paradise

By Barbara Klein Moss

Faith and fanaticism mingle in this unique, challenging tale.

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Know Your Beholder

By Adam Rapp

Though exceedingly dark in places, this novel ultimately trumpets the resilience of the human spirit.

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The Lodger is Louisa Treger’s fictionalized account of Dorothy Miller Richardson’s early life and love affairs: from her involvement on the fringes of women’s suffrage to her coming of age as a writer in England. Here, Treger discusses feminism, fidelity, and the complexity of relationships.

Book Review

Funny Girl

By Nick Hornby

A working-class beauty queen takes on 1960s television in this funny, probing novel.

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The author of Riveted: The Science of Why Jokes Makes Us Laugh, Movies Make Us Cry and Religion Makes Us Feel One with the Universe talks about the inner workings of the mind.

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Can childhood wounds ever heal? Maybe, says the author.

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The First Bad Man

By Miranda July

This stunning debut novel is a weirdo’s epic of unusual love, strange sex, and the search for happiness.

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The author discusses Gutenberg’s Apprentice, her debut novel about ambition, reform, and the machine that changed the world.

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The author talks about setting, believable characters, and things that go bump in the night.

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Let Me Be Frank With You

By Richard Ford

Richard Ford’s much-loved Frank Bascombe is back for a fourth turn, and he’s as cranky, introspective, judgmental, unapologetically Democratic, and wise as ever.

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Reunion

By Hannah Pittard

Thematically derived from a John Cheever short story, in Reunion, a woman learns that her estranged father has committed suicide and returns to her hometown to make sense of what's left in his wake.

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Growing up in Bangladesh, Maria Chaudhuri burned with a passion that separated her from her family. As she matured, the author came to understand her desires as an inheritance from her loved ones — whom she still struggles to understand.

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Florence Gordon

By Brian Morton

A novel about a family on the verge of splitting apart because of secrets, frustrated ambition, and disparate needs.

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Loretto Jones is a tough guy who finds himself falling into a life of organized crime with Vincent “Mad Dog” Coll. Yet Loretto has a soft side — especially for Gina Baronti. Can her love save him? Here, Ed Falco discusses his new novel, Toughs, based partly on events in the true-life story of gangster Coll.

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Diary of the Fall

Michel Laub

A Jewish boy in Brazil struggles with the echoes of trauma.

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Sekret

Lindsay Smith

Caught by the KGB, teenage Yulia is forced to use her psychic powers for evil to protect her family until she figures out her own path.

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Three novels take us into the abyss.

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The Painter

By Peter Heller

A good book about being bad.